2018 Conference Programme Released

Remember to book your place for the WePrint Conference 2018 if you haven’t done so already the conference is less than a few six weeks away and is taking place in Blenheim on Tuesday 17th and Wednesday 18th July at the Marlborough Convention Centre and is going to be another great event!

With some spectacular speakers already booked, including Kellie Northwood, Cameron Bagrie, Jamie Fitzgerald , Peter Stevens and Kirk Hardy we are pleased to announce the release of the 2018 conference programme: –

WePrint Conference Programme 2018

For more details please get in touch with Lauren Keen.

Lauren Keen | Promote Ltd

PO Box 50166, Porirua 5240 | Unit G, 47 Kenepuru Drive, Porirua 5022

P 04 237 0482 | M 021 848 184 | www.promoteltd.co.nz

2018 WePrint Conference Speakers

Remember to book your place for the WePrint Conference 2018 if you haven’t done so already! The conference is taking place in Blenheim on Tuesday 17th and Wednesday 18th July at the Marlborough Convention Centre.

We are pleased to announce we have booked some spectacular speakers for this year…

 

Kellie Northwood – TSA Limited: Kellie was a fantastic speaker last year and will return to give us an update on what has happened in the industry in the past year and advise on promotional opportunity

Cameron Bagrie – Economist: Following on from Bernard Hickey’s session last year…Cameron will give us an update on the new governments effect

Jamie Fitzgerald – Leadership Specialist: As one of New Zealand’s most sought-after management consultants, Jamie will talk about bridging the gap between strategy, leadership and high-performance culture

Peter Stevens – GS1 Limited: Peter will speak on Barcode Technology & Innovationsomething which affects all of us. Tracking and tracing products is the way of the future

Kirk Hardy – The Drug Detection Agency: Kirk was a huge success last year and returns to give more information and advice in this field

 

The full programme will provide thought provoking and stimulating topics, and we look forward to seeing you in Blenheim on the 17th & 18th July – registration is open NOW! Register

In the meantime please do book your flights and accommodation to Blenheim. Conference will commence at 10am sharp on the 17th July.

Please get in touch with Lauren Keen fro more details.

Lauren Keen | Promote Ltd

PO Box 50166, Porirua 5240 | Unit G, 47 Kenepuru Drive, Porirua 5022

P 04 237 0482 | M 021 848 184 | www.promoteltd.co.nz

 

2018 WePrint Conference Registration Open

Registration is now OPEN for the WePrint Conference 2018! The conference is taking place in Blenheim on Tuesday 17th and Wednesday 18th July at the Marlborough Convention Centre.

Please Click here to book your place! Take time to look through the newly revamped website which details all of the conference information as well as previous conference collateral from the past few years.

We are pleased to announce we have booked some spectacular speakers for this year…

Kellie Northwood – TSA Limited: Kellie was a fantastic speaker last year and will return to give us an update on what has happened in the industry in the past year and advise on promotional opportunity

Cameron Bagrie – Economist: Following on from Bernard Hickey’s session last year…Cameron will give us an update on the new governments effect

Jamie Fitzgerald – Leadership Specialist: As one of New Zealand’s most sought-after management consultants, Jamie will talk about bridging the gap between strategy, leadership and high-performance culture

Peter Stevens – GS1 Limited: Peter will speak on Barcode Technology & Innovationsomething which affects all of us. Tracking and tracing products is the way of the future

 The full programme will provide thought provoking and stimulating topics, and we look forward to seeing you in Blenheim on the 17th & 18th July – registration is open NOW! www.weprint.co.nz

In the meantime please do book your flights and accommodation to Blenheim. Conference will commence at 10am sharp on the 17th July

2018 We Print Conference

The 2018 We Print Conference will be taking place in Blenheim on Tuesday 17th and Wednesday 18th July. Make sure you save the date – following the great success of last year it’s going to be a good one and we don’t want you to miss out! 

We advise you to book flights early to get the best possible deals and accommodation is already available to book.

We will send you more information on the conference and registration as soon as it is available.

If you have any questions in the meantime, feel free to contact any of the We Print Committee Members detailed below or Lauren on 04 237 0482

 

2018 SWUG – New Name “WePrint”

A rapidly changing print industry has driven the rebranding of Swug to WePrint to appeal to all New Zealand printers and graphic arts specialists
 
The two-day conference at the Marlborough Convention Centre from July 17-18 will see the return of Kellie Northwood, chief executive of Australian-based TSA, and Kirk Hardy from the Drug Detection Agency, both popular speakers at last year’s event, among others that reflect the broader industry.
 
Swug chairman, Russell Wieck, operations manager for NZME.Print says he’s not sure what initiated the conversation about rebranding the organisation, but he felt it was time to freshen up what they had to offer the industry. He says, “We’re in an industry which is shrinking across the world every year, although the rate of decline in newspaper printing in New Zealand is half that being seen in Australia.
 
“The newspaper industry here is quite buoyant depending on which sector you look at and some aren’t declining at all. Having said that, SWUG wants to broaden its appeal and the executive committee made the decision some time ago to include heatset.
 
“Newspapers put a lot of heatset print into papers in the form of inserts, stationery, etc. The new name WePrint represents movement forward, so that we are not just focussed on one sector, but all types of print.”
 
Swug treasurer, Craig Harrison, general manager of operations at PMP New Zealand, agrees, saying that the rebranding comes from the concept of inclusivity. Swug has previously only included those involved in the newspaper industry. He says, “About six years ago, the chairman at the time, Dan Blackbourn suggested we include heatset printers. We are now going a step further and opening it up to all printers including digital and sheetfed and making it a New Zealand wide printing industry conference.”
 
Sponsors have reacted positively to the move, saying the new name should attract more people to the annual conference and enable us to get a wider range of relevant speakers. Harrison says, “There’s a lot of common ground across the industry now and as we always did get a good turnout, we need to grow it and get more people involved because we speak the same language. There’s an ever growing interaction between digital and newsprint and that’s only likely to increase.”
 
He says smaller communities cannot afford to invest in large web presses so it makes sense to attract delegates from these places where they invest in other forms of printing.
 
PMP Auckland digital designer Sora Waningsinggel designed the new logo for WePrint, an adaption of last year’s conference logo depicting the concept that the printing industry forms a tangibly trusted part of every community. Its design aims to reflect the inclusivity of the new WePrint group.
 
Swug New Zealand traces its history back to 1986 when a number of local production staff travelled to attend the Australian Swug event. They understood the core concept of setting up a venue for newspaper production people to come together to help solve operational issues by way of open discussion between users and suppliers.
 
John Green of Wilson & Horton, now NZME.Print, became the first New Zealand chairman, and the inaugural Swug New Zealand Conference took place in Mangere in late 1999, attracting about 20 delegates with an equal number of suppliers. Conferences took place at Dunedin, Gisborne, Wellington, Whakatane, Nelson, Napier, Christchurch and Hamilton, before going into a hiatus until the Taupo conference in 2010.
 
Then, with a new committee on board and the input of new energy, it enjoyed a record-breaking event at Taupo’s Wairakei Resort over two days. Last year’s Auckland conference also enjoyed great success with 120 delegates attending.
 
Harrison describes Swug as an industry institution ever since its inception here in New Zealand. Regarded as fit for purpose at the time, the organisation recognises how the industry has changed and has adapted to changes such as digitisation in parts of newspaper production.
 
Geoff Austin, production manager of the Gold Coast Bulletin, founded the Australian Swug organisation in 1985 for users of single width coldset newspaper presses in Australia. Like Swug New Zealand, it looked to provide a forum for production people to exchange ideas and information about the printing process at the grass roots level.
 
However, with Swug Australia in recess for about two years, WePrint hopes to attract some delegates from that industry to New Zealand in July.

2017 Marketing Keynote by Kellie Northwood

Print…Strongest Brand for Recall

“Print is clawing its way back into favour and should be used as a foundation of any media marketing campaign using digital technology” Kellie Northwood told delegates.

 Speaking on digitalisation in the physical world she says: “As an industry ,we need to get ourselves organised to engage the consumer, using every opportunity to point out the value of print and to use technology together with print to our advantage.”

The executive director of not-for-profit TSA Ltd and director of creative and communications agency Sierra Delta says: “We are our own worst enemies in print, but when you pull apart all the statistics, print is strong and magazine paper tonnage is stabilising. We do need to understand how consumers are shifting, however.”

Pulling out statistics she showed that both print and digital news media were stable and print was still the strongest brand for recall and favourability. And the failure in the expectation of huge profitability in online digital news and advertising is “driving us back to print. Magazines are back and in New Zealand research shows that 70% of New Zealand adults over the age of 14 still read printed catalogues.”

But just because print is back, it doesn’t mean marketers should neglect digital technology in their offering. The most successful brands used both; print as the foundation and innovative digital to add the wow factor.

She cites as an example the brand Nivea that in one promotion overseas had solar panels printed onto the back of a magazine that consumers at the beach (or presumably anywhere else they were sitting in the sun) could attach and recharge their phones from. Another innovative promotion was child-sized armbands offered in magazines that could be linked to a mobile phone app which would ping if the wearer moved outside a certain radius – perfect for sunbathing parents with young children at the beach!

“Nivea is using every version of technology to cement their brand as innovative.”

“We’ve got better technology in this region – we should be getting our heads around it and using it! This means using our press capacity as well as technology. It can lead to greater opportunities.”

Newspapers in Japan, Brazil and Israel are merging print and digital together using augmented reality (AR) where specific mobile phone apps made parts of the newspaper 3D or interactive.

She believes that research is already being carried out somewhere overseas that is looking at making connectivity within paper itself.

“We have to sell digital and merge it to print. We need to add it to the story. But we also need to work on having one (mobile phone) application for all industry players to make it simple for consumers.”

Kellie explained that having multiple phone apps across the industry when it came to using digital enhancements like AR (augmented reality), was confusing for consumers. The industry needed to develop and agree on one application for people to use. This would make the use of AR much more useful to clients and their end users, and that consensus was imperative in moving forward for all marketers.

As for print without the digital attachment, there was plenty of evidence that it was fit and healthy, as experienced by brands that used magazines, brochures and inserts to add to their advertising arsenal.

In Australia, the Coles magazine had a 96% increase in its advertising revenue, Woolworth’s Fresh magazine had 4.1 million readers. David Jones’ fashion magazine had 250,000 circulated copies, three times that of Vogue, Bazaar, Elle or Vogue Living. IKEA’s printed catalogue was the foundation of their AR offering.

“At 125% increase in sales to a retailer through their magazine, that is pure gold. Print definitely shouldn’t pack up and go home.”

Kellie also covered personalisation in variable print, saying there was a need to move away from mass production in marketing.

“Marketing needs to be targeted and for that you have to know your audience and how you can personalise imagery.”

2017 News Keynote by Bernard Hickey

Unpaid Online Publishing Doesn’t Make Sense

Calling himself a heretic, guest speaker and financial commentator Bernard Hickey packed no punches by telling SWUG delegates to value their products, especially newsprint, and to start charging for their online news sites. 

Hickey says he was party to the early digital groupthink that came to the conclusion if they published their printed news content online, advertisers would pay for it. The truth is they didn’t and revenues have subsequently fallen.

“We were wrong and we need to stop.”

The good news is online subscription rates for legitimate news organisations are rising, and trust in “news” shared on forums like Facebook and Google is diminishing. Charging for good quality news is paying off, he told delegates.

His “good news vs bad news” presentation outlined the pressures legitimate newspapers and news organisations faced in the light of the current digital age.

He told them valuing print was important because it added to its legitimacy.

“If you pay nothing, you get nothing of value is the thought.”

Newspapers should be looking at charging online subscriptions and developing relationships with their readers so they trust and value them.

In 1991, long before the Facebook revolution, he worked for Reuters, one of the first digital news services, he says.

News was distributed electronically on small Reuter’s screens owned by currency traders all over the world, who were paying thousands of pounds for the service “so we’ve been publishing electronically for a long time and were being paid for it.”

“Publishing online and not being paid for it doesn’t make sense.”

He added that the underlying message from New Zealand’s newspaper executives was that it’s just a matter of time before they stop publishing newspapers; that there is no longer any need for dailies.

“The whole feeling around newspapers is that they are dying. But companies should embrace their readers digitally and in print, because print advertising is way more effective.”

In terms of reader recall, research showed that newspapers (in print) enjoyed a 75% recall rate while digital had only a 44% rate.

“We need to fight to retain readers and advertisers and build relationships with them. Publishing online for free has been a huge mistake for newspaper companies for us and for democracy.”

It has meant fewer journalists, less coverage of important community services like local councils and courts and high value news areas like business and politics.

“Fewer journalists means we end up with a higher sugar content than protein, what I call non-stories.”

Outlining what he called “the Facebook effect” on the news industry, Hickey says that thankfully people are now looking to a more trusted media. At the same time, Facebook statistics in this country alone are sobering.

There are 2.9m active New Zealand users and 2.3m New Zealander’s use Facebook every day, up to 14 times a day. People spend up to 50 minutes on average on it, and 64% use it for news. Of those 60% of media posts are shared without reading them. And the human attention span for this medium is down from 12 seconds in 2000 to eight seconds in 2016.

He says Trump used Facebook very effectively
to win the election by targeting individuals’ newsfeeds with multiple message variations to sow confusion and create messages in filtered bubbles. He spent 95% of his campaign budget targeting 14 million people within just eight states.

“Facebook has changed the world because
we live in a bubble of fake news; there’s a loss of shared facts and splintered, filtered news sources. The Facebook newsfeed is all about the dopamine rush when we like, share and flick.” 

2017 Open networking dinner

The networking dinner held on Wednesday night, 23rd August will be MC’d by New Zealand’s pre-eminent comedy team 7DAYS stars Jeremy Corbett, Dai Henwood and Paul Ego.

“You’ve welcomed us into your homes New Zealand (printers), your rollers have begged for the laughter to stop and now we’re gonna offset your entire SWUGging word”.

We have opened up this night to non-conference attendees for only $95! So spread the word as tickets will be limited!

To book online click this link.

2017 SWUG Pre-conference tabloid

This year’s SWUG Conference is shaping up to be a great one! The pre-conference tabloid will be coming out in the next week or so. In the meantime we wanted to let you know what we have got lined up so attached is an electronic version of the tabloid.

Make sure you jump online and get registered for the conference if you haven’t already done so by visiting our registration link.

Looking forward to seeing you at SWUG 2017, below is the pre-conference tabled, for best view please use full screen mode.